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"=NETWORKDAYS" formula returns a "#NAME?" error message - ..

 
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-K.T.
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Since: Oct 17, 2005
Posts: 1



PostPosted: Mon Oct 17, 2005 8:45 pm    Post subject: "=NETWORKDAYS" formula returns a "#NAME?" error message - SO
Archived from groups: microsoft>public>excel>crashesgpfs (more info?)

If you get the "#NAME?" error when using the "=NETWORKDAYS" formula to
determine the number of working days between two dates, do the following:

1) Format two additional columns as "date" fields, but be sure to select the
"full date" option that does NOT have an ASTERISK ( * ) at the beginning
[*3/14/2001]. The choice with the asterisk is at the top of the list, but
the correct date format choice [3/14/2001] is located at the BOTTOM of the
list.

2) Select & copy the dates from the first two columns and use "paste
special" to paste them into the two newly formatted columns specifying "as
VALUEs".

3) The "=NETWORKDAYS" formula will now show the resulting number of days
instead of the error message.

This had been stumping me for quite a while and I could NOT find the answer
in any of the Help topics or in the help questions/replies. I stumbled on
the solution by accident and just had to share it! YAYAYAY!

-K.T.
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Jerry W. Lewis
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Since: Aug 25, 2003
Posts: 694



PostPosted: Tue Oct 18, 2005 12:45 am    Post subject: Re: "=NETWORKDAYS" formula returns a "#NAME?" error message [Login to view extended thread Info.]
Archived from groups: per prev. post (more info?)

NETWORKDAYS() is not an Excel function, it is an Analysis ToolPak (ATP)
function. As documented in Help, #NAME! occurs when ATP is either not
installed or not loaded. Your directions do nothing to address that
basic issue.

My best guess is that the worksheet (with #NAME! errors showing) was
saved in a later version of Excel that did not have the ATP. You then
opened it in an earlier version of Excel (which will not automatically
recalculate sheets saved by a later version) that did have the ATP.
Your series of steps merely forced a recalc that could have been done
more easily by replacing all occurrances of "=" with "=".

Jerry

-K.T. wrote:

> If you get the "#NAME?" error when using the "=NETWORKDAYS" formula to
> determine the number of working days between two dates, do the following:
>
> 1) Format two additional columns as "date" fields, but be sure to select the
> "full date" option that does NOT have an ASTERISK ( * ) at the beginning
> [*3/14/2001]. The choice with the asterisk is at the top of the list, but
> the correct date format choice [3/14/2001] is located at the BOTTOM of the
> list.
>
> 2) Select & copy the dates from the first two columns and use "paste
> special" to paste them into the two newly formatted columns specifying "as
> VALUEs".
>
> 3) The "=NETWORKDAYS" formula will now show the resulting number of days
> instead of the error message.
>
> This had been stumping me for quite a while and I could NOT find the answer
> in any of the Help topics or in the help questions/replies. I stumbled on
> the solution by accident and just had to share it! YAYAYAY!
>
> -K.T.
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Jcold



Joined: Jun 17, 2010
Posts: 1



PostPosted: Thu Jun 17, 2010 10:54 am    Post subject: [Login to view extended thread Info.]

You should not need to change any formating - just check your have the analysis toolpak enabled / ticked (Menu > tools > add-ins >) and then the correct values should show.

JC.

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