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Abbreviation for Carbon Dioxide

 
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Abi
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Since: Jan 12, 2005
Posts: 5



PostPosted: Sat May 02, 2009 4:27 pm    Post subject: Abbreviation for Carbon Dioxide
Archived from groups: microsoft>public>word>docmanagement (more info?)

How do I create the small 2 that's placed slightly higher than the other
characters in for example the abbreviation CO2?
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grammatim
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Since: Jan 08, 2009
Posts: 86



PostPosted: Sat May 02, 2009 6:43 pm    Post subject: Re: Abbreviation for Carbon Dioxide [Login to view extended thread Info.]
Archived from groups: per prev. post (more info?)

Or, select it and type Ctrl-=. This works best if you've continued
typing your line and at some point go back and do it, so that you
don't have to worry about changing the following characters back to
normal.

Also, in some fonts (including the "C" fonts that come with Word2007,
Cambria Math, and several others, but unfortunately not Times New
Roman), there are special characters for the subscript and superscript
numbers; you get at them with Insert > Symbol and going to the
"Superscripts and subscripts" section of the display (using the
dropdown at the top right).

You can then assign them Keyboard Shortcuts, or you can assign them to
AutoCorrect entries as Herb suggests.

On May 2, 4:15 pm, CyberTaz wrote:
> Actually, for chemicals like that the 2 should be "slightly *lower" not
> higher.After the CO type Control+= then type the 2. Then type Control+=
> again to turn Subscript off. Alternatively just type the 2, select it, then
> go to [depending on version of Word] Format> Font & apply Subscript.
>
> HTH |:>)
> Bob Jones
> [MVP] Office:Mac
>
> On 5/2/09 3:27 PM, in article
> 65C4EBB6-291E-4657-9461-F752CA510...@microsoft.com, "Abi"
>
>
>
> wrote:
> > How do I create the small 2 that's placed slightly higher than the other
> > characters in for example the abbreviation CO2?-
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Suzanne S. Barnhill
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Since: Sep 26, 2003
Posts: 24483



PostPosted: Sat May 02, 2009 7:16 pm    Post subject: Re: Abbreviation for Carbon Dioxide [Login to view extended thread Info.]
Archived from groups: per prev. post (more info?)

Select the 2 and press Ctrl+= or use Format | Font | Subscript. (Note that
the 2 should be lower than the letters, not higher.)

--
Suzanne S. Barnhill
Microsoft MVP (Word)
Words into Type
Fairhope, Alabama USA
http://word.mvps.org

"Abi" wrote in message

> How do I create the small 2 that's placed slightly higher than the other
> characters in for example the abbreviation CO2?
>
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CyberTaz
External


Since: Jul 20, 2005
Posts: 666



PostPosted: Sat May 02, 2009 8:15 pm    Post subject: Re: Abbreviation for Carbon Dioxide [Login to view extended thread Info.]
Archived from groups: per prev. post (more info?)

Actually, for chemicals like that the 2 should be "slightly *lower" not
higher.After the CO type Control+= then type the 2. Then type Control+=
again to turn Subscript off. Alternatively just type the 2, select it, then
go to [depending on version of Word] Format> Font & apply Subscript.

HTH |:>)
Bob Jones
[MVP] Office:Mac



On 5/2/09 3:27 PM, in article
65C4EBB6-291E-4657-9461-F752CA510AA5@microsoft.com, "Abi"
wrote:

> How do I create the small 2 that's placed slightly higher than the other
> characters in for example the abbreviation CO2?
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Herb Tyson [MVP]
External


Since: Oct 02, 2003
Posts: 2152



PostPosted: Sat May 02, 2009 8:40 pm    Post subject: Re: Abbreviation for Carbon Dioxide [Login to view extended thread Info.]
Archived from groups: per prev. post (more info?)

....and if it's something you need frequently, consider creating an
AutoCorrect entry to automatically convert co2 into the correct format each
time it's typed. I use AutoCorrect entries for h2o, h2so4, etc. It's very
handy, and ultimately, a big time saver.

--
Herb Tyson MS MVP
Author of the Word 2007 Bible
Blog: http://word2007bible.herbtyson.com
Web: http://www.herbtyson.com


"CyberTaz" wrote in message

> Actually, for chemicals like that the 2 should be "slightly *lower" not
> higher.After the CO type Control+= then type the 2. Then type Control+=
> again to turn Subscript off. Alternatively just type the 2, select it,
> then
> go to [depending on version of Word] Format> Font & apply Subscript.
>
> HTH |:>)
> Bob Jones
> [MVP] Office:Mac
>
>
>
> On 5/2/09 3:27 PM, in article
> 65C4EBB6-291E-4657-9461-F752CA510AA5@microsoft.com, "Abi"
> wrote:
>
>> How do I create the small 2 that's placed slightly higher than the other
>> characters in for example the abbreviation CO2?
>
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macropod
External


Since: Jan 10, 2009
Posts: 157



PostPosted: Sat May 02, 2009 11:10 pm    Post subject: Re: Abbreviation for Carbon Dioxide [Login to view extended thread Info.]
Archived from groups: per prev. post (more info?)

Hi Herb,

If you've got that many chemical formulae, a macro solution like the following might do the job more efficiently -

Sub ChemicalFormatter()
Dim oRng As Range, fRng As Range
Application.ScreenUpdating = False
With Selection
Set oRng = .Range
With .Find
.ClearFormatting
.Text = "[A-Z)][0-9]{1,}"
.MatchWildcards = True
.Wrap = wdFindContinue
.Forward = True
Do While .Execute = True
Set fRng = ActiveDocument.Range(Start:=Selection.Start + 1, End:=Selection.End)
fRng.Font.Subscript = True
fRng.Collapse Direction:=wdCollapseEnd
' Uncomment the next line to process only the selected range
If fRng.End = oRng.End Then Exit Do
Loop
End With
End With
oRng.Select
Set fRng = Nothing
Set oRng = Nothing
Application.ScreenUpdating = True
End Sub

The above macro will search for and process all 'chemical' formulae in the document in one pass. If your document has other
upper-case alphanumeric strings in which a number follows a letter (eg Table cell references), you'll need to uncomment the line
indicated and select the range(s) containing the text to be converted.

--
Cheers
macropod
[Microsoft MVP - Word]


"Herb Tyson [MVP]" wrote in message
> ...and if it's something you need frequently, consider creating an AutoCorrect entry to automatically convert co2 into the correct
> format each time it's typed. I use AutoCorrect entries for h2o, h2so4, etc. It's very handy, and ultimately, a big time saver.
>
> --
> Herb Tyson MS MVP
> Author of the Word 2007 Bible
> Blog: http://word2007bible.herbtyson.com
> Web: http://www.herbtyson.com
>
>
> "CyberTaz" wrote in message
>> Actually, for chemicals like that the 2 should be "slightly *lower" not
>> higher.After the CO type Control+= then type the 2. Then type Control+=
>> again to turn Subscript off. Alternatively just type the 2, select it, then
>> go to [depending on version of Word] Format> Font & apply Subscript.
>>
>> HTH |:>)
>> Bob Jones
>> [MVP] Office:Mac
>>
>>
>>
>> On 5/2/09 3:27 PM, in article
>> 65C4EBB6-291E-4657-9461-F752CA510AA5@microsoft.com, "Abi"
>> wrote:
>>
>>> How do I create the small 2 that's placed slightly higher than the other
>>> characters in for example the abbreviation CO2?
>>
>
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macropod
External


Since: Jan 10, 2009
Posts: 157



PostPosted: Sat May 02, 2009 11:10 pm    Post subject: Re: Abbreviation for Carbon Dioxide [Login to view extended thread Info.]
Archived from groups: per prev. post (more info?)

Macro correction for processing just the selected range - change the code inside the loop to:

Set fRng = ActiveDocument.Range(Start:=Selection.Start + 1, End:=Selection.End)
' Uncomment the next line to process only the selected range
' If fRng.End >= oRng.End Then Exit Do
fRng.Font.Subscript = True
fRng.Collapse Direction:=wdCollapseEnd

--
Cheers
macropod
[Microsoft MVP - Word]


"macropod" wrote in message
> Hi Herb,
>
> If you've got that many chemical formulae, a macro solution like the following might do the job more efficiently -
>
> Sub ChemicalFormatter()
> Dim oRng As Range, fRng As Range
> Application.ScreenUpdating = False
> With Selection
> Set oRng = .Range
> With .Find
> .ClearFormatting
> .Text = "[A-Z)][0-9]{1,}"
> .MatchWildcards = True
> .Wrap = wdFindContinue
> .Forward = True
> Do While .Execute = True
> Set fRng = ActiveDocument.Range(Start:=Selection.Start + 1, End:=Selection.End)
> fRng.Font.Subscript = True
> fRng.Collapse Direction:=wdCollapseEnd
> ' Uncomment the next line to process only the selected range
> If fRng.End = oRng.End Then Exit Do
> Loop
> End With
> End With
> oRng.Select
> Set fRng = Nothing
> Set oRng = Nothing
> Application.ScreenUpdating = True
> End Sub
>
> The above macro will search for and process all 'chemical' formulae in the document in one pass. If your document has other
> upper-case alphanumeric strings in which a number follows a letter (eg Table cell references), you'll need to uncomment the line
> indicated and select the range(s) containing the text to be converted.
>
> --
> Cheers
> macropod
> [Microsoft MVP - Word]
>
>
> "Herb Tyson [MVP]" wrote in message
>> ...and if it's something you need frequently, consider creating an AutoCorrect entry to automatically convert co2 into the
>> correct format each time it's typed. I use AutoCorrect entries for h2o, h2so4, etc. It's very handy, and ultimately, a big time
>> saver.
>>
>> --
>> Herb Tyson MS MVP
>> Author of the Word 2007 Bible
>> Blog: http://word2007bible.herbtyson.com
>> Web: http://www.herbtyson.com
>>
>>
>> "CyberTaz" wrote in message
>>> Actually, for chemicals like that the 2 should be "slightly *lower" not
>>> higher.After the CO type Control+= then type the 2. Then type Control+=
>>> again to turn Subscript off. Alternatively just type the 2, select it, then
>>> go to [depending on version of Word] Format> Font & apply Subscript.
>>>
>>> HTH |:>)
>>> Bob Jones
>>> [MVP] Office:Mac
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> On 5/2/09 3:27 PM, in article
>>> 65C4EBB6-291E-4657-9461-F752CA510AA5@microsoft.com, "Abi"
>>> wrote:
>>>
>>>> How do I create the small 2 that's placed slightly higher than the other
>>>> characters in for example the abbreviation CO2?
>>>
>>
>
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macropod
External


Since: Jan 10, 2009
Posts: 157



PostPosted: Sun May 03, 2009 5:10 am    Post subject: Re: Abbreviation for Carbon Dioxide [Login to view extended thread Info.]
Archived from groups: per prev. post (more info?)

A couple more refinements:
.. Change
.Text = "[A-Z)][0-9]{1,}"
to
.Text = "[a-zA-Z)][0-9]{1,}"
.. Change
' Uncomment the next line to process only the selected range
' If fRng.End >= oRng.End Then Exit Do
to
' Uncomment the next two lines to process only the selected range
' If fRng.Start >= oRng.End Then Exit Do
' If fRng.End > oRng.End Then fRng.End = oRng.End

--
Cheers
macropod
[Microsoft MVP - Word]


"macropod" wrote in message
> Macro correction for processing just the selected range - change the code inside the loop to:
>
> Set fRng = ActiveDocument.Range(Start:=Selection.Start + 1, End:=Selection.End)
> ' Uncomment the next line to process only the selected range
> ' If fRng.End >= oRng.End Then Exit Do
> fRng.Font.Subscript = True
> fRng.Collapse Direction:=wdCollapseEnd
>
> --
> Cheers
> macropod
> [Microsoft MVP - Word]
>
>
> "macropod" wrote in message
>> Hi Herb,
>>
>> If you've got that many chemical formulae, a macro solution like the following might do the job more efficiently -
>>
>> Sub ChemicalFormatter()
>> Dim oRng As Range, fRng As Range
>> Application.ScreenUpdating = False
>> With Selection
>> Set oRng = .Range
>> With .Find
>> .ClearFormatting
>> .Text = "[A-Z)][0-9]{1,}"
>> .MatchWildcards = True
>> .Wrap = wdFindContinue
>> .Forward = True
>> Do While .Execute = True
>> Set fRng = ActiveDocument.Range(Start:=Selection.Start + 1, End:=Selection.End)
>> fRng.Font.Subscript = True
>> fRng.Collapse Direction:=wdCollapseEnd
>> ' Uncomment the next line to process only the selected range
>> If fRng.End = oRng.End Then Exit Do
>> Loop
>> End With
>> End With
>> oRng.Select
>> Set fRng = Nothing
>> Set oRng = Nothing
>> Application.ScreenUpdating = True
>> End Sub
>>
>> The above macro will search for and process all 'chemical' formulae in the document in one pass. If your document has other
>> upper-case alphanumeric strings in which a number follows a letter (eg Table cell references), you'll need to uncomment the line
>> indicated and select the range(s) containing the text to be converted.
>>
>> --
>> Cheers
>> macropod
>> [Microsoft MVP - Word]
>>
>>
>> "Herb Tyson [MVP]" wrote in message
>>> ...and if it's something you need frequently, consider creating an AutoCorrect entry to automatically convert co2 into the
>>> correct format each time it's typed. I use AutoCorrect entries for h2o, h2so4, etc. It's very handy, and ultimately, a big time
>>> saver.
>>>
>>> --
>>> Herb Tyson MS MVP
>>> Author of the Word 2007 Bible
>>> Blog: http://word2007bible.herbtyson.com
>>> Web: http://www.herbtyson.com
>>>
>>>
>>> "CyberTaz" wrote in message
>>>> Actually, for chemicals like that the 2 should be "slightly *lower" not
>>>> higher.After the CO type Control+= then type the 2. Then type Control+=
>>>> again to turn Subscript off. Alternatively just type the 2, select it, then
>>>> go to [depending on version of Word] Format> Font & apply Subscript.
>>>>
>>>> HTH |:>)
>>>> Bob Jones
>>>> [MVP] Office:Mac
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> On 5/2/09 3:27 PM, in article
>>>> 65C4EBB6-291E-4657-9461-F752CA510AA5@microsoft.com, "Abi"
>>>> wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> How do I create the small 2 that's placed slightly higher than the other
>>>>> characters in for example the abbreviation CO2?
>>>>
>>>
>>
>
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