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Gordon
External


Since: May 18, 2011
Posts: 7



PostPosted: Wed May 18, 2011 11:10 pm    Post subject: Setting up a linux server.
Archived from groups: comp>os>linux>setup (more info?)

I need|want to set up a small file server on my home network.

The three things I want to do with it are:
- provide a place to put various files that can be accessed
by any work station.

- Spool a network printer. I already have a networked printer,
but it is using some real ancient hardware.

- email: I use Thunderbird for e-mail. I would want to
store T-bird's configuration files and e-mail folders
on the server so that any user can find their e-mail
regardless of which workstation they log in on.

Other uses may come up later.

I want to do this on the cheap. So i have a couple of
retired 1 Gig Athalon machines I would like to repurpose
for this. These aern't the fastest machines around
anymore, but may be usable with a trim version
of Linux.

So what do you think? Doable? What Linux distro would
you reccomend. BTW: I'm a relitive Linux newbie. But,
a fairly well advanced computer user.
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Keith Keller
External


Since: Jun 21, 2006
Posts: 528



PostPosted: Wed May 18, 2011 11:10 pm    Post subject: Re: Setting up a linux server. [Login to view extended thread Info.]
Archived from groups: per prev. post (more info?)

On 2011-05-18, Gordon wrote:
>
> The three things I want to do with it are:
> - provide a place to put various files that can be accessed
> by any work station.

If you have Windows and/or OS X clients, you can use samba, included
with most distros.

> - Spool a network printer. I already have a networked printer,
> but it is using some real ancient hardware.

CUPS should work fine for this purpose (even though I hate it), which
is also included with most distros.

> - email: I use Thunderbird for e-mail. I would want to
> store T-bird's configuration files and e-mail folders
> on the server so that any user can find their e-mail
> regardless of which workstation they log in on.

Simply put your users' configuration on the network share and point
Thunderbird to it.

> I want to do this on the cheap. So i have a couple of
> retired 1 Gig Athalon machines I would like to repurpose
> for this. These aern't the fastest machines around
> anymore, but may be usable with a trim version
> of Linux.
>
> So what do you think? Doable? What Linux distro would
> you reccomend.

I always recommend that you should use the same distro that the person/
people you hope to ask for advice the most uses. They are all similar
enough that it's pointless to say one is ''better'' than another for
a given purpose.

--keith



--
kkeller-usenet@wombat.san-francisco.ca.us
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David W. Hodgins
External


Since: Dec 04, 2005
Posts: 348



PostPosted: Wed May 18, 2011 11:10 pm    Post subject: Re: Setting up a linux server. [Login to view extended thread Info.]
Archived from groups: per prev. post (more info?)

On Wed, 18 May 2011 18:09:58 -0400, Gordon wrote:

> I need|want to set up a small file server on my home network.

> So what do you think? Doable? What Linux distro would
> you reccomend. BTW: I'm a relitive Linux newbie. But,
> a fairly well advanced computer user.

If you know someone who knows linux well, use whatever distribution
they use. Any distro should work for what you've described,
provided the hardware (in particular the printer) is supported by
linux.

For a quick test of the hardware, and for a quick intro to linux,
I'd start with a live cd/dvd, such as Knoppix. It'll run a lot
slower from a cd/dvd, but it makes it easy to quickly see if the
hardware works.

Regards, Dave Hodgins

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Aragorn
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Since: Feb 22, 2009
Posts: 87



PostPosted: Thu May 19, 2011 12:10 am    Post subject: Re: Setting up a linux server. [Login to view extended thread Info.]
Archived from groups: per prev. post (more info?)

On Thursday 19 May 2011 00:09 in comp.os.linux.setup, somebody
identifying as Gordon wrote...

> I need|want to set up a small file server on my home network.
>
> The three things I want to do with it are:
> - provide a place to put various files that can be accessed
> by any work station.

That's what "/srv" on the server machine is for. Wink

> - Spool a network printer. I already have a networked printer,
> but it is using some real ancient hardware.

CUPS should be able to handle that pretty well. Wink

> - email: I use Thunderbird for e-mail. I would want to
> store T-bird's configuration files and e-mail folders
> on the server so that any user can find their e-mail
> regardless of which workstation they log in on.

Hmm... There are two ways I see for going about this...

1) Set up a local IMAP4 server with Courier or Exim or
something; or

2) Create user accounts on the server and install
Thunderbird on it. Then use X11 forwarding, so that
whenever someone logs in on the workstation and fires
up Thunderbird, the Thunderbird session is running
remotely (and using the configuration files and mail
dirs on the server) while being displayed on the local
workstation's screen.

> Other uses may come up later.
>
> I want to do this on the cheap. So i have a couple of
> retired 1 Gig Athalon machines I would like to repurpose
> for this.

Do you mean 1 GHz or 1 GB of RAM? If the latter, that's plenty for a
workstation, but perhaps a bit tight for a (busy) server.

If the former, 1 GHz is more than enough as a workstation which will
essentially be working as a thin client - well, X11 forwarding is not
exactly the same, but you can go the "thin client way" too. Wink

> These aern't the fastest machines around anymore, but may be usable
> with a trim version of Linux.
>
> So what do you think? Doable? What Linux distro would
> you reccomend. BTW: I'm a relitive Linux newbie. But,
> a fairly well advanced computer user.

Well, it's not clear - at least, to me - whether your retired machines
will be used as workstations or whether you seek to use one of them as
a server.

You mention "1 Gig", but that's not really saying much - see above - and
processor speed is one thing, but amount of available RAM and diskspace
is another. So it's kind of hard to recommend a particular
distribution to you.

I can only give you some vague and generic recommendations, especially
since you mention relative newbie status, and that is CentOS or Debian
Stable for the server, and possibly - depending on speed and RAM - any
lightweight distribution for the workstations. If you're going to be
using them as true thin clients, then there are special images you can
download, because a true thin client only needs to connect to the
network and the server, and display images on the screen, so to speak.
So it doesn't need a whole lot - it doesn't even need a hard disk, as
it can boot off of a floppy or a CD, or even PXE boot if the BIOS and
the NIC support that.

Hope this was useful... Wink

--
*Aragorn*
(registered GNU/Linux user #223157)
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The Natural Philosopher
External


Since: Jul 06, 2009
Posts: 196



PostPosted: Thu May 19, 2011 12:10 am    Post subject: Re: Setting up a linux server. [Login to view extended thread Info.]
Archived from groups: per prev. post (more info?)

Gordon wrote:
> I need|want to set up a small file server on my home network.
>
> The three things I want to do with it are:
> - provide a place to put various files that can be accessed
> by any work station.
>
> - Spool a network printer. I already have a networked printer,
> but it is using some real ancient hardware.
>
> - email: I use Thunderbird for e-mail. I would want to
> store T-bird's configuration files and e-mail folders
> on the server so that any user can find their e-mail
> regardless of which workstation they log in on.
>
> Other uses may come up later.
>
> I want to do this on the cheap. So i have a couple of
> retired 1 Gig Athalon machines I would like to repurpose
> for this. These aern't the fastest machines around
> anymore, but may be usable with a trim version
> of Linux.
>
> So what do you think? Doable? What Linux distro would
> you reccomend. BTW: I'm a relitive Linux newbie. But,
> a fairly well advanced computer user.

Perfect. In fact I ended up with a new Intel Atom fanless to save power

You need a minimum of I would say 256M of RAM.

You don't need much beyond a stock server setup in - say - Debian.

Webmin is a good way to manage stuff remotely. and CUPS comes with its
own web based daemon.

You will need SAMBA (and maybe netatalk if you want to serve old
Macintoshes (OS/9)), for file serving to windoze.

Is quite hard to store T-birds config files on the server, but the data
files are easy. I do that.

A lot depends on what clients you want to have access the file space and
printer.

A recommendation. Use twin disks and mirror one to the other with Rsync
nightly.

Then if one goes, the other has all the data you will want to keep.

Second recommendation.

Split each disk in half as well.
and backup all the setups on the client machines on that as well.
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David Brown
External


Since: Nov 25, 2005
Posts: 75



PostPosted: Thu May 19, 2011 8:10 am    Post subject: Re: Setting up a linux server. [Login to view extended thread Info.]
Archived from groups: per prev. post (more info?)

On 19/05/2011 01:16, Aragorn wrote:
> On Thursday 19 May 2011 00:09 in comp.os.linux.setup, somebody
> identifying as Gordon wrote...
>
>> I need|want to set up a small file server on my home network.
>>
>> The three things I want to do with it are:
>> - provide a place to put various files that can be accessed
>> by any work station.
>
> That's what "/srv" on the server machine is for. Wink
>

As others have said, that's what /samba/ is for. You can put the files
in a directory under /src if you want.

>> - Spool a network printer. I already have a networked printer,
>> but it is using some real ancient hardware.
>
> CUPS should be able to handle that pretty well. Wink
>
>> - email: I use Thunderbird for e-mail. I would want to
>> store T-bird's configuration files and e-mail folders
>> on the server so that any user can find their e-mail
>> regardless of which workstation they log in on.
>
> Hmm... There are two ways I see for going about this...
>
> 1) Set up a local IMAP4 server with Courier or Exim or
> something; or
>

Courier is an IMAP server, and is serious overkill unless you are
familiar with it, or are looking to serve many thousands of users.

Exim is an MTA, not a mail server.


However, the idea of using an IMAP server is the right one. Once you
have started using IMAP for your email, you will never go back to the
dark ages of POP3 - you'll find it hard to conceive why anyone would use
anything else.

What you want here is Dovecot. Without question, it is the easiest imap
server to configure and work with, and it is also typically the fastest
and most efficient (especially with maildir). All distros will have it,
and include a basic configuration. When you have only a few home users,
you can set up authentication (usernames and passwords) in a simple text
file to make it even easier.

For outgoing mail, users can either send directly to their ISP, or you
can configure an MTA on the server. The two most common are Exim and
Postfix - use whatever your distro has as default, and you will have a
minimum of configuration. You can collect mail from external POP3 boxes
using a fetchmail script that delivers to the IMAP directories.


It might sound like setting up a mail server is a lot more effort than
using POP3 and storing email locally on a workstation. It is certainly
a bit more effort, especially if the concepts are new to you, but it's
not /that/ hard - and the Dovecot website has a lot of useful help.
There are also a fair number of how-tos on the web. And if it doesn't
work, what have you lost but a bit of your time? But once it is up and
running, then all your email is stored on the server - not the
workstations. Email clients then get a view of that email, but it's the
server that is the primary storage. So you can have a client set up on
each workstation, or even multiple clients (maybe you want to try KMail
or Evolution as well as Thunderbird). If you set up your firewall
appropriately, you can also access it from outside or from a smart
mobile phone.



> 2) Create user accounts on the server and install
> Thunderbird on it. Then use X11 forwarding, so that
> whenever someone logs in on the workstation and fires
> up Thunderbird, the Thunderbird session is running
> remotely (and using the configuration files and mail
> dirs on the server) while being displayed on the local
> workstation's screen.
>

Don't use X forwarding here. Sometimes X forwarding is a useful trick,
but it is slow and awkward compared to running things locally - it's
heyday is long since passed.


>> Other uses may come up later.
>>
>> I want to do this on the cheap. So i have a couple of
>> retired 1 Gig Athalon machines I would like to repurpose
>> for this.
>
> Do you mean 1 GHz or 1 GB of RAM? If the latter, that's plenty for a
> workstation, but perhaps a bit tight for a (busy) server.
>

1 GB ram is loads for a server like this. It's always nice with more
ram, and it will make some things faster, but I wouldn't have worried if
he had said 512 MB on the server. I have a file server at the office
here with a 90 MHz processor and 64 MB ram, though I wouldn't like to
run a mail server or printer server on it.

> If the former, 1 GHz is more than enough as a workstation which will
> essentially be working as a thin client - well, X11 forwarding is not
> exactly the same, but you can go the "thin client way" too. Wink
>
>> These aern't the fastest machines around anymore, but may be usable
>> with a trim version of Linux.
>>
>> So what do you think? Doable? What Linux distro would
>> you reccomend. BTW: I'm a relitive Linux newbie. But,
>> a fairly well advanced computer user.
>
> Well, it's not clear - at least, to me - whether your retired machines
> will be used as workstations or whether you seek to use one of them as
> a server.
>
> You mention "1 Gig", but that's not really saying much - see above - and
> processor speed is one thing, but amount of available RAM and diskspace
> is another. So it's kind of hard to recommend a particular
> distribution to you.
>
> I can only give you some vague and generic recommendations, especially
> since you mention relative newbie status, and that is CentOS or Debian
> Stable for the server, and possibly - depending on speed and RAM - any
> lightweight distribution for the workstations. If you're going to be
> using them as true thin clients, then there are special images you can
> download, because a true thin client only needs to connect to the
> network and the server, and display images on the screen, so to speak.
> So it doesn't need a whole lot - it doesn't even need a hard disk, as
> it can boot off of a floppy or a CD, or even PXE boot if the BIOS and
> the NIC support that.
>
> Hope this was useful... Wink
>

I am also a fan of Debian for servers. CentOS is a good choice if you
want "industry standard" software but don't want paid commercial support
(i.e., Red Hat RHEL) - however, that's typically not an issue for a home
user.

I would recommend that you first burn a few live CDs and get the feel of
what you want to use on the workstations - then you can get a related
server distribution. Pretty much all server distributions will work
fine for you, so it makes sense to pick something that minimises your
learning curves. If you like the look of Ubuntu on the desktop, get
Ubuntu Server on the server. If you prefer Mint Debian, go for Debian
on the server.

For the workstations, you need to have a look at Ubuntu. I've gone off
it myself, but it is very popular and worth checking out. I would
recommend Linux Mint Debian for workstations, or Linux Mint Xfce (which
is also Debian-based) for weaker workstations. They give you everything
you need, pretty much out of the box.

Don't forget when testing that live CDs are a lot slower than real
installations. If possible, use a live USB stick instead of the CD.
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Aragorn
External


Since: Feb 22, 2009
Posts: 87



PostPosted: Thu May 19, 2011 3:10 pm    Post subject: Re: Setting up a linux server. [Login to view extended thread Info.]
Archived from groups: per prev. post (more info?)

On Thursday 19 May 2011 09:35 in comp.os.linux.setup, somebody
identifying as David Brown wrote...

> On 19/05/2011 01:16, Aragorn wrote:
>
>> On Thursday 19 May 2011 00:09 in comp.os.linux.setup, somebody
>> identifying as Gordon wrote...
>>
>>> I need|want to set up a small file server on my home network.
>>>
>>> The three things I want to do with it are:
>>> - provide a place to put various files that can be accessed
>>> by any work station.
>>
>> That's what "/srv" on the server machine is for. Wink
>
> As others have said, that's what /samba/ is for. You can put the
> files in a directory under /src if you want.

Well, he was asking about providing a *place* so I took that literally.
And Samba is only needed if some of the workstations run Windows. If
the clients run GNU/Linux, he would be better off with NFS.

>>> - email: I use Thunderbird for e-mail. I would want to
>>> store T-bird's configuration files and e-mail folders
>>> on the server so that any user can find their e-mail
>>> regardless of which workstation they log in on.
>>
>> Hmm... There are two ways I see for going about this...
>>
>> 1) Set up a local IMAP4 server with Courier or Exim or
>> something; or
>
> Courier is an IMAP server, and is serious overkill unless you are
> familiar with it, or are looking to serve many thousands of users.
>
> Exim is an MTA, not a mail server.
> [...]
> What you want here is Dovecot.

I meant Dovecot, yes, but somehow I wrote Exim. Wink

--
*Aragorn*
(registered GNU/Linux user #223157)
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Gordon
External


Since: May 18, 2011
Posts: 7



PostPosted: Fri May 20, 2011 5:10 am    Post subject: Re: Setting up a linux server. [Login to view extended thread Info.]
Archived from groups: per prev. post (more info?)

Aragorn wrote in
email.me:

>>>> The three things I want to do with it are:
>>>> - provide a place to put various files that can be accessed
>>>> by any work station.
>>>
>>> That's what "/srv" on the server machine is for. Wink
>>
>> As others have said, that's what /samba/ is for. You can put the
>> files in a directory under /src if you want.
>
> Well, he was asking about providing a *place* so I took that literally.
> And Samba is only needed if some of the workstations run Windows. If
> the clients run GNU/Linux, he would be better off with NFS.

I should be a bit more specific. The workstations are running Win XP.
I'll be adding another workstation latter this year and I'll be the
primary user of that machine. When that happens, I will seriously
consider making that one a linux box. The server is a different
project. I want it to provide network storage to the Win boxes
via the Map Network Drive function. Sounds like a job for Samba.
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Gordon
External


Since: May 18, 2011
Posts: 7



PostPosted: Fri May 20, 2011 5:10 am    Post subject: Re: Setting up a linux server. [Login to view extended thread Info.]
Archived from groups: per prev. post (more info?)

Aragorn wrote in
email.me:

>> I want to do this on the cheap. So i have a couple of
>> retired 1 Gig Athalon machines I would like to repurpose
>> for this.
>
> Do you mean 1 GHz or 1 GB of RAM? If the latter, that's plenty for a
> workstation, but perhaps a bit tight for a (busy) server.
>
> If the former, 1 GHz is more than enough as a workstation which will
> essentially be working as a thin client - well, X11 forwarding is not
> exactly the same, but you can go the "thin client way" too. Wink

Sorry; that would be a 1Ghz Athalon with about 256 or 512Mb of RAM.

This would be the server.
I have a pair of 2.5Ghz workstaions running Windows.
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Aragorn
External


Since: Feb 22, 2009
Posts: 87



PostPosted: Fri May 20, 2011 6:10 am    Post subject: Re: Setting up a linux server. [Login to view extended thread Info.]
Archived from groups: per prev. post (more info?)

On Friday 20 May 2011 06:44 in comp.os.linux.setup, somebody identifying
as Gordon wrote...

> Aragorn wrote in
> email.me:
>
>>> I want to do this on the cheap. So i have a couple of
>>> retired 1 Gig Athalon machines I would like to repurpose
>>> for this.
>>
>> Do you mean 1 GHz or 1 GB of RAM? If the latter, that's plenty for a
>> workstation, but perhaps a bit tight for a (busy) server.
>>
>> If the former, 1 GHz is more than enough as a workstation which will
>> essentially be working as a thin client - well, X11 forwarding is not
>> exactly the same, but you can go the "thin client way" too. Wink
>
> Sorry; that would be a 1Ghz Athalon with about 256 or 512Mb of RAM.
^^^^^^^

Since you repeat the error, I presume that it's not a typo. Wink The
correct name is Athlon. Wink

> This would be the server.

512 MB /may/ be enough for the server, but I would personally recommend
going for 1 GB, considering that the processor's already not too fast.
You don't want it to be hitting swap all the time. Wink

--
*Aragorn*
(registered GNU/Linux user #223157)
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The Natural Philosopher
External


Since: Jul 06, 2009
Posts: 196



PostPosted: Fri May 20, 2011 7:10 am    Post subject: Re: Setting up a linux server. [Login to view extended thread Info.]
Archived from groups: per prev. post (more info?)

Aragorn wrote:
> On Friday 20 May 2011 06:44 in comp.os.linux.setup, somebody identifying
> as Gordon wrote...
>
>> Aragorn wrote in
>> email.me:
>>
>>>> I want to do this on the cheap. So i have a couple of
>>>> retired 1 Gig Athalon machines I would like to repurpose
>>>> for this.
>>> Do you mean 1 GHz or 1 GB of RAM? If the latter, that's plenty for a
>>> workstation, but perhaps a bit tight for a (busy) server.
>>>
>>> If the former, 1 GHz is more than enough as a workstation which will
>>> essentially be working as a thin client - well, X11 forwarding is not
>>> exactly the same, but you can go the "thin client way" too. Wink
>> Sorry; that would be a 1Ghz Athalon with about 256 or 512Mb of RAM.
> ^^^^^^^
>
> Since you repeat the error, I presume that it's not a typo. Wink The
> correct name is Athlon. Wink
>
>> This would be the server.
>
> 512 MB /may/ be enough for the server, but I would personally recommend
> going for 1 GB, considering that the processor's already not too fast.
> You don't want it to be hitting swap all the time. Wink
>
It wont

No graffix mate. Ergo no need for RAM.

with just samba running its all FILE I/O and really you may decide that
you want to fast write the disk anyway if there is any cahnce of power
failures etc.
I am on my 4th instance of a windows file server based on Linux. None
had more than 512M.

IDE-> SATA made far more difference.
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David W. Hodgins
External


Since: Dec 04, 2005
Posts: 348



PostPosted: Fri May 20, 2011 7:11 am    Post subject: Re: Setting up a linux server. [Login to view extended thread Info.]
Archived from groups: per prev. post (more info?)

On Fri, 20 May 2011 00:40:39 -0400, Gordon wrote:

> I should be a bit more specific. The workstations are running Win XP.

When you get stuck with the task of adding a windows 7 system to the
lan, see http://wiki.samba.org/index.php/Windows7 for the registry
entries that will have to be added, to allow w7 to see the samba or the
xp workgroup.

Regards, Dave Hodgins

--
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Trevor Hemsley
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Since: Nov 28, 2006
Posts: 27



PostPosted: Fri May 20, 2011 9:30 am    Post subject: Re: Setting up a linux server. [Login to view extended thread Info.]
Archived from groups: per prev. post (more info?)

On Fri, 20 May 2011 04:44:32 UTC in comp.os.linux.setup, Gordon
wrote:

> Aragorn wrote in
> email.me:
>
> >> I want to do this on the cheap. So i have a couple of
> >> retired 1 Gig Athalon machines I would like to repurpose
> >> for this.
> >
> > Do you mean 1 GHz or 1 GB of RAM? If the latter, that's plenty for a
> > workstation, but perhaps a bit tight for a (busy) server.
> >
> > If the former, 1 GHz is more than enough as a workstation which will
> > essentially be working as a thin client - well, X11 forwarding is not
> > exactly the same, but you can go the "thin client way" too. Wink
>
> Sorry; that would be a 1Ghz Athalon with about 256 or 512Mb of RAM.
>
> This would be the server.
> I have a pair of 2.5Ghz workstaions running Windows.

My only thought about this is that a machine of this age and spec is likely to
eat electricity. It might be cheaper in the long run to buy a small modern box
that'll do the job and not cost an arm and a leg to run on a daily basis.

--
Trevor Hemsley, Brighton, UK
Trevor dot Hemsley at ntlworld dot com
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David Brown
External


Since: Nov 25, 2005
Posts: 75



PostPosted: Fri May 20, 2011 10:10 am    Post subject: Re: Setting up a linux server. [Login to view extended thread Info.]
Archived from groups: per prev. post (more info?)

On 20/05/2011 06:40, Gordon wrote:
> Aragorn wrote in
> email.me:
>
>>>>> The three things I want to do with it are:
>>>>> - provide a place to put various files that can be accessed
>>>>> by any work station.
>>>>
>>>> That's what "/srv" on the server machine is for. Wink
>>>
>>> As others have said, that's what /samba/ is for. You can put the
>>> files in a directory under /src if you want.
>>
>> Well, he was asking about providing a *place* so I took that literally.
>> And Samba is only needed if some of the workstations run Windows. If
>> the clients run GNU/Linux, he would be better off with NFS.
>
> I should be a bit more specific. The workstations are running Win XP.
> I'll be adding another workstation latter this year and I'll be the
> primary user of that machine. When that happens, I will seriously
> consider making that one a linux box. The server is a different
> project. I want it to provide network storage to the Win boxes
> via the Map Network Drive function. Sounds like a job for Samba.

Yes, you want samba here.

I often like samba even for Linux-to-Linux sharing - I find it more
flexible than NFS, and it seems to cope better if you get network
problems. NFS is a bit more efficient, and gives you more Linux
features (named pipes, hard links, etc.) - but I haven't found the need
for these in networked setups. It's also a matter of taste, experience
and convenience.
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David Brown
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Since: Nov 25, 2005
Posts: 75



PostPosted: Fri May 20, 2011 10:10 am    Post subject: Re: Setting up a linux server. [Login to view extended thread Info.]
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On 20/05/2011 09:11, David W. Hodgins wrote:
> On Fri, 20 May 2011 00:40:39 -0400, Gordon wrote:
>
>> I should be a bit more specific. The workstations are running Win XP.
>
> When you get stuck with the task of adding a windows 7 system to the
> lan, see http://wiki.samba.org/index.php/Windows7 for the registry
> entries that will have to be added, to allow w7 to see the samba or the
> xp workgroup.
>
> Regards, Dave Hodgins
>

You only need to fiddle with these if you are working with a domain -
just use a simple workgroup and there is no problem accessing your samba
server from any windows machine (> Win95).
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The Natural Philosopher
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Since: Jul 06, 2009
Posts: 196



PostPosted: Fri May 20, 2011 10:10 am    Post subject: Re: Setting up a linux server. [Login to view extended thread Info.]
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David Brown wrote:
> On 20/05/2011 06:40, Gordon wrote:
>> Aragorn wrote in
>> email.me:
>>
>>>>>> The three things I want to do with it are:
>>>>>> - provide a place to put various files that can be accessed
>>>>>> by any work station.
>>>>>
>>>>> That's what "/srv" on the server machine is for. Wink
>>>>
>>>> As others have said, that's what /samba/ is for. You can put the
>>>> files in a directory under /src if you want.
>>>
>>> Well, he was asking about providing a *place* so I took that literally.
>>> And Samba is only needed if some of the workstations run Windows. If
>>> the clients run GNU/Linux, he would be better off with NFS.
>>
>> I should be a bit more specific. The workstations are running Win XP.
>> I'll be adding another workstation latter this year and I'll be the
>> primary user of that machine. When that happens, I will seriously
>> consider making that one a linux box. The server is a different
>> project. I want it to provide network storage to the Win boxes
>> via the Map Network Drive function. Sounds like a job for Samba.
>
> Yes, you want samba here.
>
> I often like samba even for Linux-to-Linux sharing - I find it more
> flexible than NFS, and it seems to cope better if you get network
> problems. NFS is a bit more efficient, and gives you more Linux
> features (named pipes, hard links, etc.) - but I haven't found the need
> for these in networked setups. It's also a matter of taste, experience
> and convenience.
>

Maybe things have improved, but I found SMB woeful with linux clients.

I simply hard NFS mount the server at boot and that's that. Its 'there'
and behaves exactly like any normal mounted file system.
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The Natural Philosopher
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Since: Jul 06, 2009
Posts: 196



PostPosted: Fri May 20, 2011 11:10 am    Post subject: Re: Setting up a linux server. [Login to view extended thread Info.]
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Trevor Hemsley wrote:
> On Fri, 20 May 2011 04:44:32 UTC in comp.os.linux.setup, Gordon
> wrote:
>
>> Aragorn wrote in
>> email.me:
>>
>>>> I want to do this on the cheap. So i have a couple of
>>>> retired 1 Gig Athalon machines I would like to repurpose
>>>> for this.
>>> Do you mean 1 GHz or 1 GB of RAM? If the latter, that's plenty for a
>>> workstation, but perhaps a bit tight for a (busy) server.
>>>
>>> If the former, 1 GHz is more than enough as a workstation which will
>>> essentially be working as a thin client - well, X11 forwarding is not
>>> exactly the same, but you can go the "thin client way" too. Wink
>> Sorry; that would be a 1Ghz Athalon with about 256 or 512Mb of RAM.
>>
>> This would be the server.
>> I have a pair of 2.5Ghz workstaions running Windows.
>
> My only thought about this is that a machine of this age and spec is likely to
> eat electricity. It might be cheaper in the long run to buy a small modern box
> that'll do the job and not cost an arm and a leg to run on a daily basis.
>
Its a very simple exercise in cost-benefit analysis.

Say a server runs at 60W, and a year is 10,000 hours (close enough).

It therefore uses 600 units a year, roughly.

In UK terms that's about 72.

which is about the cost of a low power motherboard BUT.

How much less will that use?

Did you need the heat anyway?
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Trevor Hemsley
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Since: Nov 28, 2006
Posts: 27



PostPosted: Fri May 20, 2011 11:10 am    Post subject: Re: Setting up a linux server. [Login to view extended thread Info.]
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On Fri, 20 May 2011 10:43:12 UTC in comp.os.linux.setup, The Natural Philosopher
wrote:

> Trevor Hemsley wrote:
> > My only thought about this is that a machine of this age and spec is likely to
> > eat electricity. It might be cheaper in the long run to buy a small modern box
> > that'll do the job and not cost an arm and a leg to run on a daily basis.
> >
> Its a very simple exercise in cost-benefit analysis.
>
> Say a server runs at 60W, and a year is 10,000 hours (close enough).
>
> It therefore uses 600 units a year, roughly.
>
> In UK terms that's about 72.
>
> which is about the cost of a low power motherboard BUT.
>
> How much less will that use?
>
> Did you need the heat anyway?

An AMD Thunderbird 1GHz (which seems like the most likely candidate for a "1GHz
Athalon") has a TDP of 54W and that doesn't take into account the usage of the
motherboard and assorted peripherals. Something like an Acer Revo uses ~20W at
idle. At a guess then that's a payback period of a couple of years or so. You
also have the added reliability of running on something brand new vs something >
10 years old.

--
Trevor Hemsley, Brighton, UK
Trevor dot Hemsley at ntlworld dot com
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The Natural Philosopher
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Since: Jul 06, 2009
Posts: 196



PostPosted: Fri May 20, 2011 12:10 pm    Post subject: Re: Setting up a linux server. [Login to view extended thread Info.]
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Trevor Hemsley wrote:
> On Fri, 20 May 2011 10:43:12 UTC in comp.os.linux.setup, The Natural Philosopher
> wrote:
>
>> Trevor Hemsley wrote:
>>> My only thought about this is that a machine of this age and spec is likely to
>>> eat electricity. It might be cheaper in the long run to buy a small modern box
>>> that'll do the job and not cost an arm and a leg to run on a daily basis.
>>>
>> Its a very simple exercise in cost-benefit analysis.
>>
>> Say a server runs at 60W, and a year is 10,000 hours (close enough).
>>
>> It therefore uses 600 units a year, roughly.
>>
>> In UK terms that's about 72.
>>
>> which is about the cost of a low power motherboard BUT.
>>
>> How much less will that use?
>>
>> Did you need the heat anyway?
>
> An AMD Thunderbird 1GHz (which seems like the most likely candidate for a "1GHz
> Athalon") has a TDP of 54W and that doesn't take into account the usage of the
> motherboard and assorted peripherals. Something like an Acer Revo uses ~20W at
> idle. At a guess then that's a payback period of a couple of years or so. You
> also have the added reliability of running on something brand new vs something >
> 10 years old.
>
that's more or less where I got to with the Atom board. 2 years payback

I was also able to replace an old printer server box and run an old
parallel HP laser printer off it too.

The office is too hot as it is.

I must say the Atom seems to be a pretty good chip. Runs 64 bit for a
start, onboard 100Mbps on my Intel board..only downside was only two
disks instantly available and that with no CDROM BUT once installed, who
needs a CD ROM on a server?

cheap, small case..low power..
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JEDIDIAH
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Since: Sep 24, 2004
Posts: 1655



PostPosted: Mon May 23, 2011 9:25 pm    Post subject: Re: Setting up a linux server. [Login to view extended thread Info.]
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On 2011-05-20, David Brown wrote:
> On 20/05/2011 09:11, David W. Hodgins wrote:
>> On Fri, 20 May 2011 00:40:39 -0400, Gordon wrote:
>>
>>> I should be a bit more specific. The workstations are running Win XP.
>>
>> When you get stuck with the task of adding a windows 7 system to the
>> lan, see http://wiki.samba.org/index.php/Windows7 for the registry
>> entries that will have to be added, to allow w7 to see the samba or the
>> xp workgroup.
>>
>> Regards, Dave Hodgins
>>
>
> You only need to fiddle with these if you are working with a domain -
> just use a simple workgroup and there is no problem accessing your samba
> server from any windows machine (> Win95).

Depends on what you are doing and what software you are using.

The usual 3rd party sorts of stuff should be fine though.

--
Apple: because you really don't want to take any more video |||
than your camera can hold. Really. / | \
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